qualitative inquiry and research design: choosing among five approaches

by Radhe

In this post, we’ll see how qualitative inquiry and research design can help us understand a particular research question and design ways to answer it. The key is to understand how research design works in a broad sense and then design a research plan that addresses how we might best approach it.

In many ways, our approach to qualitative inquiry and research design is similar to our approach to our blog: we approach everything through the lens of “What is relevant, useful, and feasible?” We think that our research is relevant because it helps us answer a question, useful because it helps us answer a question, and feasible because it helps us solve a problem.

Qualitative research can be a challenging approach, because we have to decide what is relevant, useful, and feasible, among other things. We know our research is relevant because it helps us answer a question about something we care about, useful because it helps us answer a question about something we care about, and feasible because it helps us solve a problem. However, once we have chosen our research approach, we then have to decide what question it is we are answering, and how we are answering it.

One of the more useful kinds of research is qualitative inquiry. Qualitative research can help answer questions about the experience of people. We know something about experiences because we can observe them ourselves (and so are better able to compare them) or we can ask others to describe them. But often qualitative research can also help us answer a different kind of research question, which is about what is considered normal or normal for people in a given situation.

If we know something about the experience of someone we may be able to make some predictions about what they will or won’t experience in a given situation. For example, we may be able to predict that people will be more likely to suffer bad consequences if they are forced to walk in a particular way or if they are forced to walk in a certain direction at a specific time.

If we know someone we may be able to make some predictions about what they will or wont experience in a given situation, but we will have to choose among five criteria to make a prediction. For example, if I think I’ll be more likely to walk into a specific house when I hear someone say “Hey, I know.” Or if I think I’ll be more likely to walk into a certain house when I hear someone say “Hey, I know.

The fifth approach is to have a qualitative inquiry and research design. I’m not sure which of these is right here, but I will say that it’s a good one because it’s qualitative and it’s exploratory. I’ve been doing this a lot more lately, so I’m no longer sure where this one is.

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